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Dr. Sandra Martin-Chang

 

Sandra Martin-Chang, Ph.D.

(Ph.D. Psychology 2005; McMaster University)

 

Assistant Professor, Department of Education
Concordia University

 

1455 de Maisonneuve Boul., West
Montreal, Quebec, H3G 1M8

 

Tel: 514-848-2424 ext. 8932
Office: LB-505-7
E-mail: smartinc@education.concordia.ca

 

 

 

 

Sandra Martin-Chang is a reading researcher in the Education Department at Concordia University. She received her Masters (Psychology) from the University of Aberdeen, Scotland and her PhD (Psychology) from the McMaster University, Canada. Her main areas of research focus on understanding: 1) the strengths and weaknesses of reading words in different contexts (stories and lists), 2) the impact of the family environment on literacy development (storybook reading, parent reading related knowledge, homeschooling, print exposure), and (3) the role of teacher training on student achievement.

 

 

 

 

Martin-Chang, S., & Ouellette, G. (submitted). Does poor reading mean slow spelling? The relationship between reading, spelling, and lexical quality.

 

McClintock* , B., Pesco, D., & Martin-Chang, S. (submitted). Reading between the lines: Inferences made during reading by children with Specific Language Impairments.

 

Martin-Chang, S., & Levesque*, K. (2013). Taken out of context: Differential processing in contextual and isolated word reading. Journal of Research in Reading, 36, 330–349. doi:10.1111/j.1467-9817.2011.01506.x

 

Martin-Chang, S., & Gould, O.N. (2012). Reading to children versus listening to children read: Mother/child interactions as a function of principal reader. Early Education and Development, 23, 855-876. doi:10.1080/10409289.2011.578911

 

Martin-Chang, S., Gould, O.N., & Meuse, R.E*. (2011). The impact of schooling on academic achievement: Evidence from home-schooled and traditionally-schooled students. Canadian Journal of Behavioural Science /Revue Canadienne Des Sciences Du Comportement, 43, 195-202. doi:10.1037/a0022697.