Graduate Students

 

Jacqueline Legacy

Ph.D. Clinical Psychology, Concordia University, in progress

M.Sc. Neuroscience, Carlton University, 2012

B.A. (Honours) Psychology, Carlton University, 2010


The current focus of my Ph.D research is early language development.  Specifically, I am working on a longitudinal project that is aimed at gaining a better understanding of how monolingual and bilingual infants develop their receptive and expressive vocabularies across development. A main objective of this research is to assess early receptive vocabulary skills using both parental report and the Computerized Comprehension Test (CCT), a touch-screen computer game designed to assess early receptive vocabulary skills in children under 24 months of age, with the goal of identifying similarities and differences in early language acquisition. We will also be following these children as they develop their productive vocabularies and grammatical skills, and will assess whether CCT scores can predict emerging literacy skills later on in development. This will allow us to evaluate the long-term validity of the CCT, and determine whether or not the CCT is capable of identifying language delay in both monolingual and bilingual infants.




Cristina Crivello

Ph.D. Clinical Psychology, Concordia University, in progress

M.A. Clinical Psychology, Concordia University, 2015

B.A. Psychology, Concordia University University, 2010


I am currently in the first year of my Doctorate degree in Clinical Psychology under the supervision of Dr. Diane Poulin-Dubois. My master’s thesis focused on the early emergence of cognitive benefits associated with bilingualism. Through a longitudinal design, I investigated whether becoming more fluent in two languages from 24 to 30 months of age predicts executive functioning abilities, specifically selective attention and cognitive flexibility. For my dissertation, I will pursue research in the areas of selective trust and prosocial behaviours.







Kimberly Burnside

M.A. Clinical Psychology, Concordia University, in progress

B.Sc Psychology (Honours), Concordia University, 2013


I am currently starting my Master’s Thesis in the Cognitive and Language Development Laboratory at Concordia University. Although my undergraduate thesis was about mother-infant touch during face-to-face interactions, the research topic for my Master’s Thesis is on selective learning in infants. My interests are in the development of social interactions at a young age in typically and atypically developing children.




Jessica Yott

Ph.D. Clinical Psychology, Concordia University, in progress

M.A. Clinical Psychology, Concordia University, 2011

B.A. (Honours) Psychology, Concordia University, 2009


I am currently working on my Doctoral Thesis in the Cognitive Development Laboratory at Concordia University. My research interests focus around social and cognitive development in early childhood. More specifically, my research examines the development of Theory of Mind understanding in infancy, and how it is related to other cognitive abilities.


Krystin Wright

Ph.D. Clinical Psychology, Concordia University, in progress

M.A. Clinical Psychology, Concordia University, 2011

B.A. (Honours) Psychology, York University, 2008


For my Ph.D. research I am working in collaboration with Dr. Poulin-Dubois and Dr. Elizabeth Kelley (Queens University) as a trainee of the Autism Research Training (ART) Program, a Canadian Institutes of Health Research initiative. I am currently conducting a study which examines the relationship between biological motion processing and the development of categorization abilities in typically developing children and children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). With this research I hope to gain a better understanding of how biological motion processing influences children’s understanding of animacy concepts (both implicitly and explicitly).